Welcome to Zee Tea

Types of Tea

Basically, tea comes from the plant, camellia sinensis, within which are 2 subspecies – the small leaved Chinese plant (sinensis) and the large leaved Assam plant (assamica). There are four main types of tea: black, oolong, green and white, each of which is determined by the level to which the leaves are oxidised and processed.



black tea

Black Tea

Black tea is obtained by exposing the plucked tea leaf to full oxidation. Leaves are laid out for up to 24 hours to draw out moisture content and the withered leaves are then rolled to expose surface area to oxygen and left to completely oxidise, turning the leaves to a deep black colour before a final drying takes place.

 

Generally, unblended black teas are often named after the region in which they are produced - main producers are China, India and Sri Lanka. As you would expect, climatic and geographic factors as well as processing methods greatly affect the characteristics of black tea.

 

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended black tea range:



Tea

Origin

Characteristics

Assam 

Assam region,

India

Single estate

Full bodied

Malty flavour

Rich, strong, bold

Darjeeling 

Darjeeling region,

India

Single estate

Sweet, floral

Mildly robust

Keemun

Keemun region, Anhui Province, China

Complex flavours

Mellow, sweet

Hint of smokiness

Lapsang Souchong

Wuyi mountain region, China

Smoky

Robust

Ceylon OP

Sri Lanka

Single estate

Medium bodied

Sweet

Fruity

Private Estate Ceylon 

Sri Lanka

Single estate

Full bodied

Malty sweetness

Touch of spice

 

Pu-erh

Yunnan Province,

China

Full bodied

Earthy

 

The caffeine content of a cup of black tea is roughly equivalent to half of that found in a cup of coffee.




oolong tea

Oolong Tea

Oolong tea is obtained by exposing the plucked tea leaf to partial oxidation, resulting in a tea somewhere between that of black and green, although oolong can range dramatically between the two depending on the length of oxidation undertaken. Processing is of a more gentle nature to that of black tea. After the withering process, leaves are lightly shaken causing the leaf edges to bruise and allow partial oxidation and then pan fried to halt this process.

 

The caffeine content of a cup of black tea is roughly equivalent to less than half of that found in a cup of coffee and a cup of green tea is roughly equivalent to one-third.




green tea

Green Tea

This tea type may be grown in the sun or under shade. Once picked, the leaves are immediately steamed or pan-fired to prevent oxidation and then rolled into shapes varying from long, needle-like leaves as is found in sencha teas to the tight balls as in gunpowder teas.

 

Japan and China are the major producers of green tea. Japanese teas are processed using a steam method to prevent oxidation whilst Chinese teas are usually processed by pan firing.

 

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended green tea range:

 

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended green tea range:

 

Tea

Origin

Characteristics

Sencha

Japan

Sweet

Mellow

Grassy aroma

Genmaicha

Japan

Sweet

Mellow

Savoury

Longjing

Hangzhou Province, China

Mellow

Earthy

Fresh

Gunpowder

Zhejian Province, China

Rich

Robust

Hint of smokiness



The caffeine content of a cup of green tea is roughly equivalent to one-third of that found in a cup of coffee.



white tea

White Tea

White tea is made from young select leaves and buds or, as in the case of the highly prized Silver Needles, made entirely from young tea buds. White tea can only be picked for a short time each year, making it rare and precious. Like green tea, it is subject to minimal processing to avoid oxidation taking place. The leaves and buds are steamed and then slowly dried.

 

White tea is the least processed of any tea type and contains the highest levels of antioxidants. It also contains the least amount of caffeine.

A cup of white tea is a fraction of that found in a cup of coffee.

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended white tea range:

 

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended white tea range:

Tea

Origin

Characteristics

Jasmine Pearls

China

Earthy

Floral

Silver Needles

Fujian Province, China

Sweet

Delicate

Fresh

China White

China

Sweet

Mild

Full bodied

Basically, tea comes from the plant, camellia sinensis, within which are 2 subspecies – the small leaved Chinese plant (sinensis) and the large leaved Assam plant (assamica). There are four main types of tea: black, oolong, green and white, each of which is determined by the level to which the leaves are oxidised and processed.


Black Tea

black tea

Black tea is obtained by exposing the plucked tea leaf to full oxidation. Leaves are laid out for up to 24 hours to draw out moisture content and the withered leaves are then rolled to expose surface area to oxygen and left to completely oxidise, turning the leaves to a deep black colour before a final drying takes place.

 

Generally, unblended black teas are often named after the region in which they are produced - main producers are China, India and Sri Lanka. As you would expect, climatic and geographic factors as well as processing methods greatly affect the characteristics of black tea.

 

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended black tea range:





The caffeine content of a cup of black tea is roughly equivalent to half of that found in a cup of coffee.




oolong tea

Oolong Tea

Oolong tea is obtained by exposing the plucked tea leaf to partial oxidation, resulting in a tea somewhere between that of black and green, although oolong can range dramatically between the two depending on the length of oxidation undertaken. Processing is of a more gentle nature to that of black tea. After the withering process, leaves are lightly shaken causing the leaf edges to bruise and allow partial oxidation and then pan fried to halt this process.

 

The caffeine content of a cup of black tea is roughly equivalent to less than half of that found in a cup of coffee and a cup of green tea is roughly equivalent to one-third.




green tea

Green Tea

This tea type may be grown in the sun or under shade. Once picked, the leaves are immediately steamed or pan-fired to prevent oxidation and then rolled into shapes varying from long, needle-like leaves as is found in sencha teas to the tight balls as in gunpowder teas.

 

Japan and China are the major producers of green tea. Japanese teas are processed using a steam method to prevent oxidation whilst Chinese teas are usually processed by pan firing.

 

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended green tea range:

 



The caffeine content of a cup of green tea is roughly equivalent to one-third of that found in a cup of coffee.



white tea

White Tea

White tea is made from young select leaves and buds or, as in the case of the highly prized Silver Needles, made entirely from young tea buds. White tea can only be picked for a short time each year, making it rare and precious. Like green tea, it is subject to minimal processing to avoid oxidation taking place. The leaves and buds are steamed and then slowly dried.

 

White tea is the least processed of any tea type and contains the highest levels of antioxidants. It also contains the least amount of caffeine.

A cup of white tea is a fraction of that found in a cup of coffee.

Outlined below are some facts about our unblended white tea range: